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In the fall of 2019, we removed another 450 aging Merlot vines and replaced them in the spring of 2020 with Cabernet Franc. We now have a total of approximately 1000 Cabernet Franc Vines. While working in the Vineyard in June, Sheldon rolled the ATV suffering a dislocated collarbone, multiple fractured ribs and a concussion. We are all incredibly grateful that the injuries are strictly superficial! Jace and Cait came down for a month in July and August to take some of the load off Sheldon, and Caston and Heidi came down for a month in the fall to help with Harvest. Once again, harvest came with a heavy fire

The founders of Paloma Vineyard, Barbara and Jim Richards dreamt of building a vineyard focusing on sustainable farming that would highlight the grapes and terroir of their favourite region. This dream was realized in 1983 when a friend, Dan Duckhorn, called and told them about the property now known as Paloma Vineyard. Over the next 25 years, Jim and Barbara worked to clear, plant, and cultivate the 7500 Merlot, Syrah, and Cabernet Sauvignon vines. In 1991, some of the Merlot grapes they harvested were sold to Pride to be blended into their Cabernet Sauvignon. In 1993 when Carolyn and Jim Pride released the 1991 Merlot, and it was a

In the spring of 2020, we installed a giant propane generator and three Tesla batteries to help when power outages occur. Before the Teslas were installed, we had a short power outage and the generator kicked in immediately! Worked like a charm! At least we don't have to worry this harvest. The tasting room is still a work in progress as the COVID 19 shut down Napa's planning/building department. The virus also stopped tourism and tasting customers! Like many businesses and people across America and the world, this has a significant impact on the wine industry. Through all of this, we hope our community will come out stronger. -Sheldon

Harvest of 2019 was subject to another set of fires. This time strictly North/North West of Napa in the Mendocino and Shasta regions. The smoke was mild, relatively speaking, and we suffered no permanent damage.   https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2018/08/06/wildfires-continue-to-char-california-but-one-fire-is-in-a-destructive-league-of-its-own/

Fires, smoke and power outages made 2019 another challenging year. But as always, we made it through with the valiant help from client volunteers at harvest! They were great—thank you all.  The county has required that all wineries update our user permits. For Paloma it requires some significant changes. My parents' house, that we have tasted in for 26 years, is no longer an option. We are going to build a free-standing tasting room instead! I cannot wait to show you all the new plans to bring Paloma into 2020! -Sheldon

In the winter of 2016/2017, we removed about 550 aging Merlot vines and replaced them with Cabernet Franc vines, a favourite varietal of the Paloma family. The 2017 growing season was fantastic, but due to years of drought, the fall brought waves of fires. From Northern California to North Bay to Wine Country, we were surrounded by fires all sides. Caston and Jace came down from Canada to help with harvest and support Sheldon in case of an emergency evacuation. Fortunately, CalFire was able to gain control before the fires reached Spring Mountain. In 2018, Sheldon decided to try something new; he wanted to pay homage to Barbara and

2018 may be the vintage year of the decade! Even though we had lots of smoke from the Shasta and Mendocino fires, the temperatures were moderate, so the berries were plump and beautiful. A bumper crops for the whole valley and one of five biggest crops! With a neighborhood partnership in place, we bought a firetruck and drove it home from Green Bay, WI! Quite the adventure! Then we built a firehall to protect the truck from the elements. In a perfect world, we will never use it! In the meantime, it is comforting insurance. -Sheldon

We survived the fires of 2017! Very surreal to be picking grapes and making wine while surrounded by fire on three sides with bombers and helicopters flying just above tree-top level. Hard to decide what to do with the contents of two workshops, a winery and 2.5 houses. Finally decided to just roll with it and hope for the best! Not knowing if I would have a home or livelihood was kind of daunting. My sons Caston and Jace came down from Canada to help harvest as quickly as possible. Grateful for their help during those crazy weeks. The good news: We survived! -Sheldon

This year was a tough one. In May, at the age of 83, Barbara passed away due to complications from a stroke. It left a hole in the family that will take time to fill. She was the green thumb always reminding us that great wine starts with great grapes; we are farmers first and wine makers second. We spread her ashes in the vineyard that she poured so much of her heart and sole into these past 33 years. Thank you to all; the out reach and support from the wine community has been incredible. We are humbled and honored by your kindness. And a special thank you